What is LPX Motherboard?

LPX stands for Low Profile Extension, it is a form-factor design of motherboards that was at first designed and developed by an IT firm called Western digital in the year in the year 1987. 

LPX form-factor was basically a kind of wobbly packed motherboard design that was seen to be used widely during the 90s. The LPX motherboards didn’t have any particular or dedicated set of specifications but the design frame ordinarily had dimensions of 13 by 9 inches into 330 by 229 mm. 

The clutching mounts and the IO ports of this form factor of motherboards were directly pinched at the rear of the board, even the riser card was placed in the center, which is quite different as compared to other boards. The PCI expansion slots and ISA slots were greatly attached to the riser cards themselves. 

The main drawback of this form-factor was the lack of conventional and standard sets of specifications and the riser cards were only sometimes viable starting with one motherboard plan then onto the next, substantially less one maker to another. The power supply unit was intact as the one used in the AT form-factor motherboards. 

The LPX motherboard was by all accounts not the only motherboard to have a riser card. The NLX motherboard additionally has a riser card, yet it really connected to the riser card as opposed to having the riser card on the motherboard. 

One of the more effective highlights to emerge from the LPX particular was its utilization of more minimized force supplies, which later turned out to be generally utilized on Baby AT and surprisingly full-size AT cases. Due to the explanation that LPX structure factor power supplies got universal in most PC cases before the ATX standard, it was not surprising for producers to allude to them as “AT” power supplies